Imaging is the focus of the 1998 J. Allyn Tay...

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Imaging is the focus of the 1998 J. Allyn Taylor International Prize in Medicine LONDON, ON (Nov. 3, 1998) -- The two winners of this year's prestigious J. Allyn Taylor International Prize in Medicine were announced today at a media conference at The John P. Robarts Research Institute. Renowned for their work in the area of medical imaging, they will both receive a cheque for $10,000, a medallion and a certificate at the Institute's Annual Dinner this evening at the Great Hall on the UWO campus. The Taylor Prize is awarded annually to scientists who have made significant contributions to a field of basic or clinical research in one of the Institute's principal areas of research. Each year a topic is selected and the international scientific community is invited to nominate candidates. A peer jury deliberates then identifies the prize winner or winners from among the many nominees. This year's topic is medical imaging, a field that has revolutionized medicine this century. With the introduction of computers over the last three decades, the development of medical imaging has accelerated beyond film-based x-rays to sophisticated computerized imaging techniques like digital subtraction angiography (DSA), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Today, DSA is the principle means of imaging vascular disease, and both CT and MRI routinely produce detailed 3D images of organ systems and lesions. MRI and DSA are both versatile techniques, giving us information about the patient's anatomy and vascular system, while MRI also provides information about brain chemistry, and brain function. These two techniques are indispensable tools not only in the diagnosis of disease, but also in the planning and guidance of interventional and surgical procedures, and in the fundamental study of the vascular system and brain function. Together, this year's Taylor Prize winners, have made major contributions to the disciplines mentioned above. One of the winners, Dr. Graeme Bydder, Professor of Diagnostic Radiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, England (originally from New Zealand) was one of the pioneers in developing the applications of magnetic resonance imaging to the investigation of neurological diseases. He has brought together high quality magnetic resonance techniques with his clinical practice, for the diagnosing of >brain disease. Although contributions have been made by many other neuroradiologists around the world, Dr. Bydder stands out as a consistent and innovative contributor to MRI. The second winner, Dr. Charles A. Mistretta, Professor in the Departments of Medical Physics and Radiology at The University of Wisconsin in Madison, has been a major force in the development of innovative techniques for vascular imaging. His research into basic x-ray physics and techniques, as applied to image formation and storage, led to digital subtraction techniques that are nowadays indispensable in vascular imaging. Dr. Mistretta is indeed a key figure in the scientific developments that have made many of the advances in vascular imaging over the last three decades possible, and is now at the forefront of exploring the use of MRI for vascular imaging.Founding Chair of the Board, Mr. J. Allyn Taylor, was also one of the Founders of The John P. Robarts Research Institute, Canada's only privately funded medical research facility, is an Officer of The Order of Canada and a widely respected Canadian business leader named to the Canadian Business Hall of Fame. Mr. Taylor is an individual who, throughout his lifetime, has demonstrated a deep regard for, and a passionate involvement in health care matters. He was President of the London Health Association and Chair of the Board of University Hospital, now known as London Health Sciences Centre. He has also been Chancellor of The University of Western Ontario, Chair of the Board of Canada Trust, National President of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Chair of the Board of the McMichael Collection and Chair of the Ontario Press Council. Mr. Taylor is Honourary Chair of The London Foundation. The Endowment which makes the prize possible, comes from the C. H. Stiller Memorial Foundation. Carl Hilmer Stiller (1910-1971) was a clergyman, who along with his wife Mildred, raised a family of five children on the prairies of Saskatchewan. As an innovative professional, his empathy, recognized leadership genius and statesmanship, earned him the recognition of his peers as he rose to a senior executive position within his denomination. Personally and professionally he demonstrated with unerring integrity, an intense loyalty and a consistency of purpose.Following C.H. Stiller's death, J. Allyn Taylor played a significant role in the lives of the family members and reflected many of the same personal and professional qualities of integrity, dedication and distinction that they >had seen in their father. It is to their father's memory, and the remarkable personal legacy and outstanding achievements that J. Allyn Taylor represents, that the Stiller family wishes to honour.The Robarts Research Institute was opened in 1986 and is Canada's only privately operated medical research facility, and its scientists are actively researching the major causes of death and disability. The Institute is comprised of some 365 highly qualified individuals, including scientists, hospital clinicians and technical specialists. The Imaging Research Laboratories, headed by Dr. Aaron Fenster, is one of the largest groups in the Institute, with nine researchers and an additional 70 scientific staff. This group is carrying out innovative research in many areas of medical imaging, and enjoys a world-wide reputation for its work.For more information, please contact:Irene Posliff, Communications Officer, The John P. Robarts Research Institute, (519) 663-3021