GE medical systems acquires Robarts imaging c...

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GE medical systems acquires Robarts imaging companyLONDON, ON (Nov. 8, 2002) GE Medical Systems has acquired Enhanced Vision Systems Inc., a London-based manufacturer of high-tech imaging equipment, in a move that further enhances Londons reputation as a bio-medical leader in Canada.Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS) one of seven private companies created from Robarts Research Institute was founded in 1997 and is recognized as producing leading MicroCT imaging systems for both in vivo and in vitro studies.More than 200 pharmaceutical and research studies in the areas of osteoporosis, arthritis, cancer and stroke are being conducted using EVS MicroCT technology. MicroCT imaging systems are scaled-down versions of clinical CT scanners that provide a non-invasive option for evaluating the short-term and long-term impact of a new drug or therapy.This acquisition is a huge win for Robarts and London and our partners at The University of Western Ontario and Lawson Health Research Institute, said Michael Crowley, Vice President Business Development for Robarts and Chair of Londons Life Sciences Council. It confirms that we are creating technology that has real value in the global marketplace and its particularly good news that the company will grow here and continue to attract and retain world-class scientific and business talent in London.Dr. David Holdsworth, a Robarts scientist and Associate Professor of Radiology and Medical Biophysics at Western, developed the initial prototype of the MicroCT technology along with Dr. Aaron Fenster, Director of the Imaging Laboratories at Robarts and Professor of Medical Biophysics and Engineering at Western.Michael Thornton, President of EVS, oversaw the development of the commercial CT scanners, which are now sold and used for research throughout North America. For Thornton and his colleagues, this acquisition affirms years of research invested in refining the quality of images produced by these systems. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.Microscopic computed tomography is proving to be a powerful tool for researchers working on a range of medical problems because they can quantify the effects of drugs and other therapies in small animals and tissue specimens, said Thornton, who holds a Master of Science in electrical engineering.For GE Medical Systems, the acquisition further accelerates its ongoing initiatives in molecular medicine. To make new medical breakthroughs a reality, we must take a collaborative approach that applies advanced molecular imaging technologies to pre-clinical and clinical validation of new therapies, said Eric Stahre, general manger of Genomics and Molecular Imaging, GE Medical Systems. With access to molecular images and informatics, researchers may be able to cut the cost and time of developing new drugs.For more information, please contact Linda Quattrin, Robarts Director of Communications, at (519) 663-3021 or (519) 318-5601.--30--